Posts tagged art

galerieartprimitif:

#yoruba #yorouba #art #africa #african #africain #collection #auxietre #ibeji #instagram #paris #verneuil #galerie #gallery #france (à Art Gallery L’Oeil et la Main)

My Africa Is art

galerieartprimitif:

#yoruba #yorouba #art #africa #african #africain #collection #auxietre #ibeji #instagram #paris #verneuil #galerie #gallery #france (à Art Gallery L’Oeil et la Main)

My Africa Is art

Check out London-based African Caribbean creative Jon Daniel’s series Afro Super Sistas
My Africa Is Super Lupita!

Check out London-based African Caribbean creative Jon Daniel’s series Afro Super Sistas

My Africa Is Super Lupita!

africanartagenda:

Chipika Simanwe

Country: Zambia

Style: Impressionist, Realism

Medium: Oil, mixed Media on Canvas

Fun Fact:  Chipika ‘s work has developed steadily over the years allowing a passage of an initiate into the fold of mainstream art. His earlier experiments have paid off with further exploration in his new body of work he refers ‘Red Handed’ , its clear that he has been researching to take his style further than the previous collections, this time has come more with lively colourful images in two fold, semi realistic expressions and abstract manifestations

Quote:

Works

1. Nyau Symphony

2. Chimbayambaya 2 (Wreck)

3.Very Wrecked

4. Entertainers of Mize

5. Kuomboka Fever

6. I Used to own a  bus

7. Solitude at Altitude

http://www.chipika.com/

My Africa Is mixed media on canvas

theeducatedfieldnegro:

19th century gold from the Ivory Coast

My Africa Is golden

theeducatedfieldnegro:

19th century gold from the Ivory Coast

My Africa Is golden

artblackafrica:

Nigerian artist Joseph Eze’s (b.1979) portrait series deals with the intersection between Nigeria’s politics and the female body. Click the images for the title and date

My Africa Is artful

prepaidafrica:

Top: Photo © Selorm Jay. Mural by Nima Muhinmanchi Art (NMA), an art collective based in Accra.

Middle:Photo © Selorm Jay. Celebrating a New Dawn’ mural at Nubuke Foundation.

Bottom: Photo © Selorm Jay. Mural by Nima Muhinmanchi Art (NMA), an art collective based in Accra.

The Treasures of Accra’s Growing Art Scene

http://www.anotherafrica.net/art-culture/the-treasures-of-accras-growing-art-scene

My Africa Is artistic

dynamicafrica:

A beautiful cultural blend: African kimono
The contrasting landscapes of Japan and Africa may seem, literally, worlds apart. But they have been artfully united in a collaboration between an African designer and a traditional Japanese kimono-maker. Launched last month, Wafrica — Africa plus wa for Japan — has unveiled a range of kimono handcrafted in an array of African cotton fabrics that would seem to be a million miles from the subtle silks more commonly associated with traditional Japanese dress. Yet despite the orange comets and flashes of lightning tearing across a moss-green background, and the tribal swirls in colors that recall the sun-drenched African soil, the prints blend seamlessly into the kimono form before they surprise Japanese shoppers with their foreign origin. 
The cultural cocktail is the brainchild of Serge Mouangue, a Tokyo-based concept- car designer for Nissan, who joined forces with Kururi, a Tokyo-based kimono- maker, to produce the traditional Japanese attire in 18 African prints sourced in markets from Nigeria to Senegal. 
In the sedate confines of the Kururi store on Aoyama Dori, visitors are drawn to the bright outfits placed prominently in the window display. 
“These kimono have vivid colors, and the impact is powerful,” says Izumi Ichikawa, one of the store assistants, who is immaculately clad in a more conventional pastel-hued piece. “People expect more neutral tones in kimono, but these attract younger, modern people who are looking for something different.” 
“These color combinations are not found in traditional fabrics and are new to kimono,” adds Yoko Nagai, the merchandiser at Kururi, which has been selling kimono for 15 years. “And the printed wax cotton used in Wafrica kimono does not exist in traditional kimono materials.”
Such a lack of familiarity between materials and form strengthens the effect that Mouangue is seeking to create. 
“I do not want the end result to belong to Africa, nor should it belong to Japan. It is not a ‘fusion,’ ” says Mouangue, who was born in Cameroon and grew up in Paris. “I want it to be something else. It should transcend the boundaries of both cultures. It is a third aesthetic.” 
Read the rest of this article here.

My Africa Is fusion.

dynamicafrica:

A beautiful cultural blend: African kimono

The contrasting landscapes of Japan and Africa may seem, literally, worlds apart. But they have been artfully united in a collaboration between an African designer and a traditional Japanese kimono-maker. Launched last month, Wafrica — Africa plus wa for Japan — has unveiled a range of kimono handcrafted in an array of African cotton fabrics that would seem to be a million miles from the subtle silks more commonly associated with traditional Japanese dress. Yet despite the orange comets and flashes of lightning tearing across a moss-green background, and the tribal swirls in colors that recall the sun-drenched African soil, the prints blend seamlessly into the kimono form before they surprise Japanese shoppers with their foreign origin.

The cultural cocktail is the brainchild of Serge Mouangue, a Tokyo-based concept- car designer for Nissan, who joined forces with Kururi, a Tokyo-based kimono- maker, to produce the traditional Japanese attire in 18 African prints sourced in markets from Nigeria to Senegal.

In the sedate confines of the Kururi store on Aoyama Dori, visitors are drawn to the bright outfits placed prominently in the window display.

“These kimono have vivid colors, and the impact is powerful,” says Izumi Ichikawa, one of the store assistants, who is immaculately clad in a more conventional pastel-hued piece. “People expect more neutral tones in kimono, but these attract younger, modern people who are looking for something different.”

“These color combinations are not found in traditional fabrics and are new to kimono,” adds Yoko Nagai, the merchandiser at Kururi, which has been selling kimono for 15 years. “And the printed wax cotton used in Wafrica kimono does not exist in traditional kimono materials.”

Such a lack of familiarity between materials and form strengthens the effect that Mouangue is seeking to create.

“I do not want the end result to belong to Africa, nor should it belong to Japan. It is not a ‘fusion,’ ” says Mouangue, who was born in Cameroon and grew up in Paris. “I want it to be something else. It should transcend the boundaries of both cultures. It is a third aesthetic.”

Read the rest of this article here.

My Africa Is fusion.

Wangechi Mutu Guides Us Through Her First Solo Exhibit, 'A Fantastic Journey' At The Brooklyn Museum [Okayafrica TV]

Kenyan Women Photographers in Top Spot for Canon’s “Power to Inspire” Competition

Global company, Canon, encourages photographers to capture images that incites inspiration. 2 Kenyan women photographers make it to the final rounds for their outstanding images. Read more here.

My Africa Is: Seeking a social media intern

Do you have a passion for knowledge, a genuine curiosity about Africa, and documentary film making. Well we would love to hear from you. My Africa Is seeking a social media intern, and we want the best. If you think you have what it takes respond to this ad: http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/mld/tfr/3546105877.html